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How Kids In West Africa Are Excelling In STEM Skills, and Robots

By Victor Trammell

Teaching children the skills of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) is essential to preparing them for organizing the world’s future breakthroughs in every industry.

In the West African nation of Senegal, there is a valiant effort geared toward teaching STEM skills to children, including some  students at an all-girls school in the city of Dakar. According to The New York Times, the second annual  Pan African Robotics Competition is under way this week and students from 25 African schools are participating.

This event was organized by Dr.  Sidy Ndao, a Senegalese-born  engineering professor at  the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Dr. Ndao is on a mission to teach useful STEM skills to children across West Africa. In America, the need for aggressive STEM skill education for children is definitely needed.

Dr. Ndao told The Times that the same demand for young people to learn STEM skills in Africa is needed as well. “There’s a lot of work to be done here,” said the 33-year-old Dr. Ndao in an interview with The Times.

The all-girls school at the center of a recent news report by The Times is called Mariama Be de Goree School in Senegal. This school is known as one of the best in West  Africa in terms of how well its STEM curriculum is working for students.

There is a legitimate effort in Senegal to make more schools proficient when it comes to their STEM skill curriculum. Currently, Dr. Ndao is working with students at Mariama Be de Goree and other West African schools to help them build robots for the Pan African Robotics Competition.

Many business leaders, successful entrepreneurs, and government officials in Senegal are working together toward enhancing the infrastructure of the nation’s education system to make it more STEM skill proficient. Children getting the opportunity to participate in this annual robotics competitions is a great step toward making that progress.

“We can change our future if we learn more about technology,” said Joanna Kengmeni, a young female student who participates is Dr. Ndao technology camp, which prepares children for the future.

For more information and a step by step guide on how to transition your children and family to homeschooling, visit:TheBlackHomeSchoolGuide.com.

Source:http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/30/world/africa/a-mission-to-bring-stem-skills-to-children-in-west-africa.html?rref=collection%2Fsectioncollection%2Feducation&action=click&contentCollection=education&region=rank&module=package&version=highlights&contentPlacement=1&pgtype=sectionfront&_r=1

 

 

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